The BBC reported last week that many schools were failing because of the high numbers of children showing ‘signs of dyslexia’. A study by Hull University said that dyslexia was a major cause of failure. Why this is news is still a cause of frustration to me, though I don’t know why, I face it every time I go into a college. I’m told on a weekly basis that ‘Oh we have a very thorough assessment and if they are dyslexic we do …’ Most experts would say that dyslexia is not a hit or miss syndrome. You don’t either have it or not have it. Like Autistic spectrum disorder, it is a continuum which in severe cases needs specialist teaching and intervention. However, what is not acknowledged is that small changes in teaching methods would benefit all learners with or without a diagnosis of dyslexia. The report states that up to one in five pupils could be affected and so the Government is piloting a scheme to train specialist dyslexia teachers. If one in five is affected then all teachers should be trained to deal with this ‘disorder’. If the numbers are in fact one in five then it is probably not a disorder but just a variation of the norm. Understanding the needs of dyslexic learners should be part of all teachers’ professional development and an integral part of initial teacher training. A simple start would be to allow electronic access to the lessons – but there again I would say that wouldn’t I, as an elearning adviser.

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