On Sunday last we decided to attempt Pen-y-Ghent the final of the Yorkshire Dales ‘Three Peaks’ that we still had to climb.  We took the train to Horton in Ribblesdale which is only 20 minutes from my village and we set off along a gently sloping stony path.  We had decided to do the longer walk rather than the straight up and down to the top and back so were going to walk the full length of the fell, climb the ridge and then walk along the top back to the summit.  The weather was showery and despite having been soaked to the skin on Ingleborough a couple of weeks ago we still didn’t have over trousers (£100 is a lot of money!).  The guide book mentions a couple of pot holes and we could see these by the side of the path.  Then as we approached what seemed to be a dip in the path it very quickly opened up to a 20 m chasm.  This is not for the faint hearted.  It is unfenced and just appears in front of you.  Hull Pot as it is called is said to be the largest natural hole in England.  There is no way down it other than abseiling.  The river normally disappears before it reaches the pot and emerges half way down the wall but as we had had so much rain it cascaded dramatically into the bottom.

It was a real treat and a complete and rather un-nerving surprise.  We trudged on as the showers got heavier and more horizontal and we were repeatedly soaked.  As we got to the bottom of Plover Hill at the far end of the walk I was having problems staying upright in the wind and the prospect of walking into the wind on the ridge on the way back wasn’t too appealing – so I ahem, suggested we re-think and come back another day to get to the top – when it isn’t so windy.  And perhaps we should check the forecast in the Pen-y-Ghent cafe which warned of ‘significant buffeting’ and winds of up to 45 mph.  So we retired hurt to a pint of tea and to dry out.

Hull Pot Beck disappearing

Hull Pot Beck disappearing
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